Splash Page vs Landing Page: The Key Differences Explained

Splash Page vs Landing Page: The Key Differences Explained

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Are you wondering what the difference is between a splash page vs landing page? When planning your website, knowing the differences between these pages, as well as their purpose, can help you create a successful site.

Keep reading for an explanation on these pages, and how they differ so, you can figure out what pages would most benefit your website.

What Is a Landing Page?

A landing page is the first place a website visitor will land, making it the most important page on your website.

This page will create a site visitors’ first impression of your brand. A quality landing page will display that you are a professional company that your website visitor can trust.

The main purpose of this page is to offer a first look at your brand that will increase your conversions. This page should instantly grab the viewer’s attention, engaging them to make some kind of action, such as making a purchase or signing up for a subscription.

What Is a Splash Page?

A splash page is a website that will proceed any other pages on your website. This is sometimes in the form of a welcome screen, or a teaser for your potential leads before entering your website. The purpose of a splash page differs among industries and niches.

Splash pages are usually used to create some immediacy in the form of an offer or announcement. Some may use a splash page promotional, to temp visitors to continue to a site or sign up for something.

Others may use it to update customers on an upcoming event or promotion. This guarantees that a site visitor will see this announcement, whereas they may not if you just posted it somewhere on your site. Some may use a splash page to tempt visitors to continue to the site or sign up for something.

Some splash page uses are more practical or mandatory than promotional. For example, some sites will use a splash page to allow site visitors to select their country or region.

Some companies, such as those that sell or distribute alcohol, are required to use a splash page in order to share their content. In this case, the splash page would act as a disclaimer, requiring age verification for visitors. Another potential use for a splash page is to present an alert or warning towards certain content.

Splash Page vs Landing Page

While either page could be the first thing your visitor sees based on your brand’s needs and website design, there are many differences. Both pages have their own functions and purposes. The pages are similar in that they are both used to grab viewers’ attention instantly.

These are both great tools that you can use to engage website visitors. When deciding between a splash page vs landing page for your website, consider your company needs, your customer, and how you could best reel them into taking action on your website.

Do you need expert assistance with your website design so that you can boost your conversion rates? Contact us today to schedule a free consultation.

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